Common liverwort


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Characteristics

flower Color
  • violet
  • blue
Flowering time (month)
  • March to April
shape
  • single flower
  • terminally
leaf color
  • green
leaf shape
  • dreilappig
  • kidney-shaped
Ornamental or utility value
  • Bl├╝tenschmuck
  • Nectar or pollen plant
  • native wild plant
use
  • ground cover
  • group planting
  • under planting
  • overgrowing
Hardiness
  • hardy
growth habit
  • flachw├╝chsig
  • horst making
  • carpet making

light
  • partially shaded to shady
Soil
  • sandy to loamy
soil moisture
  • moderately dry to fresh
PH value
  • alkaline to neutral
Kalkvertr├Ąglichkeit
  • kalkliebend
nutritional requirements
  • nutritious
humus
  • humous
garden style
  • natural garden
  • park
  • forest garden

origin

The hepatica (Hepatica nobilis) belongs to the family of the buttercup family (Ranunculaceae) and is a native forest shrub with sky-blue flowers, which is under protection in Germany: This means that it must not be picked or excavated at the natural site. The unusual name derives from the shape of the leaves. In the Middle Ages was allegedly closed by the liver-like shape of the leaves that liverwort has a liver-healing effect - but this is only partially true. Their small, blue flowers sprout from late February to April between dried leaves and broken branches from the forest floor. On a spring walk in the beech forest you have certainly encountered the native common liverwort ever. Rarely, white and pink specimens are to be discovered in the forest. In garden centers, however, there are a variety of unusual varieties.

growth

The low, winter-green shrubs form small, compact carpets and grow up to 15 centimeters high.

leaves

The three to six centimeters long, medium green and shiny leaves are kidney-shaped and lobed. The underside is hairy and violet colored.

Hepatica nobilis var. Pyrenaica

The broad shape of the leaves (here: Hepatica nobilis var. Pyrenaica) is reminiscent of the human liver

blossoms

From March to April, the liverwort shows its most beautiful side. The cup-shaped and hermaphrodite flowers are two to three centimeters in size and consist of three green sepals and six to nine inflorescences. The flowers are terminal and arranged radi├Ąrsymmetrisch. The flower colors range from the typical blue violet of the species over pink to white in the varieties.

fruit

The hepatica forms after flowering an inflorescence in the form of a collective fruit.

Location

If you also want to house the petite plant in the garden, you should bear in mind that it demands forest-like light and soil conditions. The liverwort likes relatively shady places under bushes and trees with slightly damp ground in winter and spring, as well as drought in summer. You can easily tell if your liverwort accepts your chosen location. If it does not feel well, the leaves quickly become spotty with dry, brown spots, mainly on the leaf margin.

ground

A calcareous, humus rich, moderately dry to fresh, well drained soil is best suited. The liverwort thrives in neutral to minimally alkaline soils.

planting

In order for the small forest dwellers to come into their own, liverwort should be planted so that they can form a larger carpet unhindered. When planting, make sure to loosen heavy soils with a little sand, so that no waterlogging can form later. If you want to cover a larger area with the liverwort you should plant the shrubs relatively densely - 24 to 26 plants per square meter are then ideal. Important when planting is that you put the plants in the soil as quickly as possible after purchase, because their roots dry out quickly.

maintenance

At the right location liverwort grows most undisturbed, in peace and quiet and need hardly any care. In autumn they should only be covered with a bit of bark mulch. Falling autumn leaves can therefore lie easily and serves the shade shrubs as a protective blanket. The old autumn leaves are only removed shortly before the new flower.

use

Liverwort flowers are great for planting under trees or for shady corners in the garden and can be easily combined with other shade plants.

sorts

In the nurseries not only the European Leberbl├╝mchen is available, but also the Asian one. Particularly sophisticated in flowering and also very expensive to buy are the Japanese liverwort (Hepatica nobilis var. Japonica).For example, the variety 'Yamahibiki' costs around 250 euros per plant! But it is also even more expensive: Genuine Leberbl├╝mchen collectors pay sums for special breeds and rarities from Japan, for which one could also buy a small car. It should be noted that some of these Asian treasures only thrive in the cool and temperate conservatory.

Other varieties

Hepatica nobilis var. Japonica 'Yamahibiki'

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Common liverwort: Hepatica nobilis

Common liverwort: nobilis

Common liverwort: nobilis

11

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Liverwort: Small Garden Jewels (11)

Common liverwort: liverwort

Hepatica nobilis var. Japonica 'Yamahibiki'

Common liverwort: common

Hepatica nobilis var. Acuta in white

Common liverwort: Hepatica nobilis

Hepatica nobilis var. Pubescens in red tones

Common liverwort: leaves

Hepatica nobilis var. Insularis in pink

Common liverwort: forest

Hepatica nobilis var. Japonica 'Tennyonomai'

Common liverwort: common

Hepatica nobilis var. Japonica 'Harukaze'

Common liverwort: leaves

Hepatica nobilis var. Japonica 'Tenzan'

Common liverwort: liverwort

Hepatica nobilis var. Japonica 'Taeka'

Common liverwort: leaves

Hepatica nobilis var. Nobilis 'Rubra Plena'

Common liverwort: nobilis

Hepatica nobilis var. Obtusa in pink

Common liverwort: liverwort

Hepatica transsilvanica 'Elison Spence'

Hepatica nobilis var. Japonica 'Yamahibiki'

Hepatica nobilis var. Acuta in white

Hepatica nobilis var. Pubescens in red tones

Hepatica nobilis var. Insularis in pink

Hepatica nobilis var. Japonica 'Tennyonomai'

Hepatica nobilis var. Japonica 'Harukaze'

Hepatica nobilis var. Japonica 'Tenzan'

Hepatica nobilis var. Japonica 'Taeka'

Hepatica nobilis var. Nobilis 'Rubra Plena'

Hepatica nobilis var. Obtusa in pink

Hepatica transsilvanica 'Elison Spence'

proliferation

Liverwort can be propagated either by division or seeding. If the perennials are divided, the best time to do so is immediately after flowering. The split plants need well-developed roots, so you should only share adult specimens. These, too, grow very slowly again.

Diseases and pests

The liverwort is a robust shade shrub and hardly susceptible to diseases and pests. However, it reacts sensitively to persistent waterlogging. Then rotting roots and leaves are the result. Therefore, pay attention to a well-drained soil.

Video Board: Life cycle of the common liverwort Marchantia polymorpha.

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