Diseases in the cherry laurel / laurel cherry


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The hitherto vital cherry laurel reveals overnight yellow or brown leaves, is covered with spots, a white patina or apparently fell into the field of fire of a shotgun. Now it's time to keep calm and make an accurate diagnosis. Since the laurel cherry is usually cultivated as a hedge plant, the entire plant row threatens to fall ill, unless countermeasures are taken immediately. The only question is, which? Discover the most common diseases of cherry laurel, the symptoms they cause, and how healing is initiated.
Overview

  • chlorosis
  • Shotgun disease
  • Powdery mildew
  • Wrong mildew
  • Monilia lace drought
chlorosis
The damage is unmistakable. The previously rich-green leaves turn yellow, while the veins continue to retain their green color. Most of the symptoms are attributed to an excess of lime in the soil, which binds vital iron so strongly that it is no longer absorbed by the laurel cherry. As a further indication of the yellowing disease, it is in particular the younger leaves that turn yellow. Chlorosis is caused by phosphate over-fertilization, by heavily calcified irrigation water, in the dewy or parched soil.

Fighting / prevention

  • Preferably pour with collected rainwater
  • Pay attention to a balanced nutrient supply
  • The soil repeatedly loosen up profoundly
  • Improve compacted, sodden soil with sand
  • Do without a thick mulch layer
Shotgun disease
If small, round, brownish-red patches develop on the leaves, which subsequently fall out, the fungal spores of the pathogen Trochila laurecerasi have struck. The entire foliage seems riddled with bullets. The leaves wither and fall off. An affected cherry laurel is then suddenly bald in the middle of summer. The shotgun disease spreads especially during rainy summer periods in the garden. Immediately effective pesticides are not yet available for use in allotments.

Fighting / prevention

  • Cut off all infected leaves and destroy them
  • Never water the cherry laurel over the foliage
  • Cook regularly to allow wet leaves to dry quickly
  • Preventively strengthen with net sulfur and horsetail tea
Powdery mildew
A widespread fungal disease does not spare the laurel cherry. After the spores overwinter on the plant or hidden in the weeds, they lurk from early summer on warm, dry weather. Therefore, powdery mildew is also called 'fair weather mushroom'. If temperatures exceed 20 degrees, the wind and insects spread the pathogen throughout the area. An infestation manifests in the first stage in the form of a white-gray patina on the tops of the leaves to work on the undersides. The foliage turns yellow, then brown, curls up, withers and falls off. Fresh shoots appear only crippled.

Fighting / prevention

  • Remove discolored and stunted leaves immediately
  • Do not administer nitrogen-stressed fertilizer
  • Repeatedly spray with a milk-water solution
  • Dissolve one tablespoon of soda in four liters of water and apply
  • Dusty leaves in the morning with prehumidified stone dust
  • Strengthen from the beginning with liverwort extract and net sulfur
  • Always plant cherry laurel in a breezy manner
  • Regularly level and cut back
  • An underplant from Tagetes keeps away fungal spores
  • Allowed pesticides: Compo mildew-free, net sulfurite and others)
Wrong mildew
Wet and cold summer weather does not signal an all-clear in the fight against mildew, because in view of the weather, downy mildew is booming. In contrast to powdery mildew, the infection manifests itself as a greyish mushroom lawn with violet shimmer on the underside of the foliage to spread through the plant tissue on the top. These pathogens are not spread by the wind or insects, but floating on the wet leaf surfaces, looking for tiny stomata.
Fighting / prevention
  • Cut off and kill off infected plants
  • Cherry laurels always pour from below in the early morning
  • Make a shape and maintenance cut at least once a year
  • Regularly administer tonic, such as Myco-Sin or liver moss extract
  • Allowed preparations: Kupferkalk-Atempo, Bayer garden special fungus-free and others)
Monilia lace drought
One of the mushrooms that haunts a cherry laurel is Monilia laxa. The frost-resistant spores overwinter in woody plants, in fruit mummies and in the soil, in order to attack the fresh sprouts in spring. Even before the flowering season begins in April, large numbers of fungal spores develop, spreading through the wind, insects or rainfall in the garden.Even in unopened flowers, they invade and infect the laurel cherry. Originally specialized in fruit trees, the hedge plant is particularly endangered where pome fruit trees are located on the site. The young leaves turn pale green to pale yellow from the tips, hang limply and eventually fall to the ground. A closer look reveals a thin mushroom turf.

Fighting / prevention

  • At the first signs of impulsive shoots cut to healthy wood
  • Endangered cherry laurel with Ulmasud B or Neudovital
  • Hedges of laurel cherries do not settle in the immediate vicinity of fruit trees
  • Do not leave fruit mummies as breeding grounds of the pathogen in the garden
  • Pay attention to an infestation of pointer plants, such as forsythia or almond trees
  • Plant airily and cut back regularly
  • Do not plant cherry laurel in wet, heavy and cold soils
  • Permitted Control: Bayer Garden Universal Mushroom-free, Teldor and others
Brown leaves signal care errors
If the leaves on the cherry laurel turn brown, experience has shown that there is no disease. Rather, the hedge plants react with this damage pattern to failures in the care. Although the ornamental wood is known for its unpretentiousness, but a minimum of attention is required for maintaining good health. The choice of location plays an important role in this context. Cherry laurel likes to be sunny to partially shaded, warm and protected. If the plant shows brown leaves after the winter, it suffered a considerable frost damage. That is, the laurel cherry was exposed to a fatal combination of frosty temperatures and cold drafts, followed by an unexpectedly rapid warming by the sun.

Fighting / prevention

  • Do not plant cherry laurels in cold, wind-exposed locations
  • In winter-cold regions, preferably planting frost-resistant species, such as 'Caucasica'
  • Remove brown leaves in March / April with a gentle pruning
  • Use a manually operated pair of scissors to prevent injury to the foliage
Conclusion
Cherry laurel precedes the call, as frugal, easy-care ornamental wood. Nevertheless, the popular hedge plant is not entirely immune to health problems. In particular, lapses weakened by care in the care, are victims of deficiency symptoms, such as chlorosis or a fungal infection. Anyone who is familiar with the symptoms correctly and initiates appropriate control measures. Then chances are good to quickly heal diseases in the cherry laurel and restore the beauty of the magnificent hedge.

Video Board: Shot Hole Disease of Cherry Laurel.

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