Douglas fir - wood, parquet, profile


The Content Of The Article:

Douglas fir - wood, parquet, profile

The scientific name of the Douglas fir is "Pseudotsuga menziesii" and it is one of the most important types of wood that have found widespread use in Germany and Central Europe.
Home is the Douglas fir in the west of North America.
Here it occupies large areas on the slopes of the Rocky Mountains and the Cascade chain from British Columbia to Mexico. In 1827, David Douglas brought her to Europe and cultivated her through England in almost all of Europe. The Douglas fir is very similar to the larch and is often confused with it.
Furthermore, it has a natural durability and therefore fulfills supporting and decorative functions alike. Provided with appropriate protection, the Douglas fir can be used outdoors for many years. This is the case with furniture as well as a floor covering.
However, in this context, it should be noted that when the Douglas fir comes into contact with soil, the outdoor use life is greatly minimized. If contact with soil can not be avoided, it should be ensured that it is pressure-impregnated Douglas fir.
Technical characteristics of Douglas fir
Douglas fir is a very dimensionally stable wood, which is also the case when it has been dried or used outdoors. The core of the Douglas fir has a maximum wood moisture content of about 40 percent. Therefore, the Douglas fir
be dried very easily, which only leads to a very low cracking.
Furthermore, the Douglas fir has a much nicer and more uniform pink to red core color than, for example, the larch, with which the Douglas fir is often confused. A particularly advantageous feature is considered the high strength of the wood, which is why the Douglas fir is ideally suited as a construction wood.
Since the Douglas fir is quite soft and has only a low resin content, it can be easily processed. Man can split her perfectly,
knife and peel. Furthermore, Douglas fir shrinks only slightly and can be glued and painted well.
By nature, Douglas fir is moderately resistant to fungi and insect infestation.
Appearance of Douglas fir
The tree trunk of the Douglas fir reaches a diameter of up to four meters. The tree itself can grow up to 100 meters. In Europe, however, the evergreen tree is usually only 60 meters high.
The crown of the Douglas fir is quite slender and conical. The very fast-growing Douglas fir reaches a maximum age of 400 to over 1400 years, has a heart-shaped root system and thrives best in deep soils. Their nutrient requirements are low.
The needles of the Douglas fir are green or blue-green, quite soft and dull. They are between three and four inches long. If you rub the needles between your fingers, you get a very aromatic and pleasant smell. In young trees, the bark of the Douglas fir is gray-green to dark gray and quite smooth.
When the tree is older, the bark develops into a coarse and cracked cork-like bark that is dark to blackish brown with some lighter cracks. The wood of the Douglas fir is reddish yellow, but darkens very quickly and is then reddish brown.
Use of Douglas fir
The wood of Douglas fir can be used in many ways. The predominant areas of application are in the veneer and plywood industry but also as construction wood wherever high stress is required, the Douglas fir is very popular.
This is how you make furniture out of it or use the wonderful look as a parquet. The Douglas fir can also be used for window and door frames. Furthermore, from her wall cladding and railway sleepers and in shipbuilding Douglas fir is very often used. In shipbuilding
Ship masts, piles, sleepers and barrels are made of Douglas fir wood. Furthermore, the Douglas fir also serves the pulp industry.

Video Board: What Kind of Wood Should You Build With? | WOODWORKING BASICS.

┬ę 2019 EN.Garden-Landscape.com. All Rights Reserved. When Copying Materials - The Reverse Link Is Required | Site Map