Sharing perennials correctly in the spring


The Content Of The Article:

The spring months are a good time to share perennials. Plants whose bloom has faded over the years or whose center verkalte, are rejuvenated by sharing, they become flowering again and remain vigorous. And by the way, you get a whole lot of new plants, which you can plant yourself or give away to your neighbors.

Not all perennials are shared in spring. The following rule of thumb applies: In early spring, you divide the summer and autumn flowering perennials. These have then already stored the nutrients that are needed for the next growing season. Spring and early summer flowers, which have withered before the St. John's Day, should be shared right after flowering.

How to properly divide your perennials in early spring

Pierce the spade or grave fork around the rhizome into the ground and move the device back and forth several times to loosen the root ball. For shrubs with a compact root system, the bale is split with a sharp spade blade, a large knife or a saw. The cuts should have at least two shoot buds and be about the size of a fist - small pieces usually drive through more vigorously and grow faster to vigorous plants than large pieces. For species with a loose root system such as sunbeam (Helenium hybrids) and smooth leaf (Aster novi-belgii), you can easily pick or break the root system by hand. Always remove the diseased and dried root parts and the shaved center of the perennial.

Share elf flower

Thanks to its loose root system, the elfin flower (Epimedium) can be picked up easily by hand

Of course, perennials do not need to be rejuvenated every year. Growth behavior and lifetime determine the time. Short-lived perennials such as maiden's eye, feathery lilies or horned vetching are fast becoming extinct and should be shared after two to three years. In the fourth year, early-summer asters, purple bells, lupines and Burning Love are shared. Long-lived species such as Larkspur, Bearded Iris, Peony, Bleeding Heart and Trollblume are only with time really nice. They should be allowed to grow as undisturbed as possible, but they often resent frequent splitting or transplanting.

These perennials are shared in the spring

Globular thistle (Echinops)

Start photo gallery

Sharing perennials correctly in the spring: perennials

Sharing perennials correctly in the spring: perennials

Sharing perennials correctly in the spring: perennials

9

Show all

These perennials are shared in the spring

Sharing perennials correctly in the spring: shared

The ball thistle (Echinops) is only divided and transplanted after 10 to 15 years

Sharing perennials correctly in the spring: perennials

After ten to 15 years, perennial sunflowers like the variety 'Lemon Queen' (Helianthus microcephalus) can be shared

Sharing perennials correctly in the spring: sharing

The purple sunhat (Echninacea purpurea), here the variety 'Orange Passion', you can record and share after three to five years

Sharing perennials correctly in the spring: sharing

The chrysanthemum (Chrysanthemum) may already be shared after three to five years

Sharing perennials correctly in the spring: shared

The sun's eye (Heliopsis) should be divided and implemented only after ten to 15 years

Sharing perennials correctly in the spring: spring

The Phlox should be rejuvenated by division after six to ten years

Sharing perennials correctly in the spring: shared

After three to five years, Monarda hybrids should be picked up and shared

Sharing perennials correctly in the spring: perennials

Yellow coneflower (Rudbeckia) is usually shared after 10 to 15 years

Sharing perennials correctly in the spring: sharing

Steppe Sage (Salvia nemorosa) is not shared before the sixth year

Globular thistle (Echinops)

Perennial Sunflower

Purple Sunhat 'Orange Passion' (Echninacea purpurea)

Chrysanthemum (Chrysanthemum) pink

Sun's eye (Heliopsis)

Phlox (Phlox paniculata 'Lilac Time')

Red Indian Sickle (Monarda fistulosa)

Yellow sunhat (Rudbeckia)

Steppe Sage (Salvia nemorosa)

Species whose individual shoots are not rooted, for example Raublatt-Aster (Aster novae-angliae) and Puffin (Astilbe species) are difficult to multiply by division. Nearly indivisible are Pasque (Pulsatilla species), Giant Gypsophila (Gypsophila paniculata) and other species that form a deep-reaching taproot.
From iron hat to wool-Ziest: We have summarized tips for the division of 20 popular flowering plants in a table. Here you can download the tips as a PDF document.

Enter email address and download PDF document

Video Board: 3 Ways to Protect Plants from Frost and Cold Weather.

© 2019 EN.Garden-Landscape.com. All Rights Reserved. When Copying Materials - The Reverse Link Is Required | Site Map