For replanting: A flowering bed of snail-resistant perennials


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If the freshly planted larkspur the next morning, only the stems with leaves and telltale traces of mucus are left over and you never see the sown lupines, because the delicate seedlings are eaten faster than they grow, you can quickly pass the pleasure of gardening. Fortunately, there are a number of perennial garden plants that do not taste snails and are largely spared by hungry animals. So you do not have to do without colorful flowers, if you want to reduce the use of slug pellets or other control measures or restrict completely.

Natural protection against snails

Some plants have hair loss protection in the form of hairy, thick-fleshed or hard leaves, others are not on the diet of mollusks because of their aromatic ingredients or bitter plant juices. Species with tender, soft plant parts and a snail-pleasing taste, on the other hand, have little chance. That is why especially the sprouting of many perennials in the recently hatched young snails is so popular in the spring. It is also endangered in newly seeded plants, which - such as the Phlox (Phlox) - are usually usually spurned in the adult state. However, if these are first cultivated in pots until they have formed enough plant mass, they also flower in the bed.

Flowering bed of snail-resistant perennials

A flowery bed of snail-resistant perennials

For replanting: A flowering bed of snail-resistant perennials

Snail-safe species are more than thought. In addition to the plants shown in the drawing also include perennials such as spur flower, Felberich, gypsophila, carnation, elven flower and balloon flower. Nasturtium, cornflower, snapdragon, hard-bitten Lieschen, evening primrose, foxglove and carnation are spared from the annual and biennial species. March cups, grape hyacinth, lily of the valley and checkerboard are considered to be snail-proof onion flowers. Those who design the flower beds with these plants can look forward to lush flowers.

Planting plan for the snail-proof perennial flowerbed

Planting plan bed snail-proof perennials

The planting plan for a bed of snail-resistant perennials

In the back row pulls the (1) Berg-Eisenhut (Aconitum napellus, bloom: June to July, height: 120 cm) looks at itself. Next to it the lights (2) Autumn Anemone (Anemone Japonica hybrid 'Whirlwind', flowering: August to October, height: 100 cm). The yellow one (3) Small-flowered daylily (Hemerocallis hybrid 'Stella de Oro', flowering: June to October, height: 30 cm) is a nice contrast to the blue-violet (4) Spurless columbine (Aquilegia vulgaris hybrid 'Blue Barlow', flowering: May to July, height: 30 cm). Filigree inflorescences shows that (5) Diamond grass (Achnatherum brachytrichum, flowering: August to November, height: 100 cm). Of the (6) Magnificent Cranesbill (Geranium x magnificum 'Rosemoor', 2 pieces, flowering: June to July, October, height: 50 cm) flowers next to it and in the front row. There he is from the (7) High fat hen (Sedum 'Matrona', flowering: August to October, height: 60 cm) and the (8) Garden carnation (Geum x heldreichii 'Sigiswang', 2 ​​pieces, flower: May to July, height: 25 cm) framed. In addition, the growing (9) Star thumbler (Astrantia major 'Shaggy', flowering: June to July, September, height: 60 cm). Dimensions of the bed: 0.75 x 2.60 m.

Order offer snail-proof perennial flowerbed

But: There is no one hundred percent guarantee against snail eating. If one species is spared, she may be on the menu somewhere else. And: Where there are many snails, more is eaten. Plots at the edges of meadows and gardens in mild and humid regions are particularly at risk. If nothing else is there, less popular plant species will be nibbled on, albeit not as intense as the snail's magnets Larkspur, Dahlia or Tagetes. These grow safer in pots or raised beds.

Other snail-resistant perennials

Bergenia

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For replanting: A flowering bed of snail-resistant perennials: snail-resistant

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No snail tastes like that

For replanting: A flowering bed of snail-resistant perennials: replanting

Bergenien are often used because of their large, winter-green, glossy leaves

For replanting: A flowering bed of snail-resistant perennials: replanting

Astilbe (Astilbe arendsii) bring color into the shade garden with their bright flower spikes

For replanting: A flowering bed of snail-resistant perennials: flowers

Elven flowers (Epimedium species) need some time to grow in, but then cover the floor as a continuous foliage carpet

For replanting: A flowering bed of snail-resistant perennials: replanting

The monkshood (Aconitum) is a conspicuous native shrub that has been cultivated for centuries in cottage gardens

For replanting: A flowering bed of snail-resistant perennials: perennials

The phlox paniculata (Phlox paniculata) is a classic magnificent shrub that is available in many vibrant colors

For replanting: A flowering bed of snail-resistant perennials: flower

The columbine (Aquilegia) has in the vernacular many names due to its unusual flower shape: gypsy bell, fool's cap, pigeon flower, elven glove or Venus car

For replanting: A flowering bed of snail-resistant perennials: flowers

The lady's mantis (Alchemilla mollis) thrives in both sunbeds and shady garden areas

For replanting: A flowering bed of snail-resistant perennials: flower

The goldenrod (Solidago) has golden-yellow inflorescences, which are arranged in narrow yellow panicles

For replanting: A flowering bed of snail-resistant perennials: perennials

The balloon flower (Platycodon grandiflorus) is a perennial plant with up to seven centimeters large, bell-shaped flowers

For replanting: A flowering bed of snail-resistant perennials: flower

The ball thistle (Echinops ritro) is a stately bedding plant for dry locations, whose steel blue flower balls are often used as cut flowers

For replanting: A flowering bed of snail-resistant perennials: replanting

The lily of the valley (Convallaria majalis) is well suited as a ground cover for the penumbra

For replanting: A flowering bed of snail-resistant perennials: snail-resistant

The pearl basket (Anaphalis triplinivernis) feels particularly good on sandy and dry, alkaline soils

For replanting: A flowering bed of snail-resistant perennials: flowering

The Peony (Paeonia) is a valuable garden with large, sometimes pompous flowers

For replanting: A flowering bed of snail-resistant perennials: replanting

The Jacob's Ladder (Polemonium caeruleum) is a filigree spring bloomer with sky-blue, violet-blue or white flower tufts

For replanting: A flowering bed of snail-resistant perennials: perennials

Cranesbill (geranium) is now available in countless different varieties

Bergenia

Astilbe (Astilbe arendsii)

Elven flowers (Epimedium species)

Iron hat (Aconitum)

Phlox (Phlox paniculata)

Columbine (Aquilegia)

Lady's Mantle (Alchemilla mollis)

Goldenrod (Solidago)

Balloon flower (Platycodon grandiflorus)

Globular thistle (Echinops ritro)

Lilies of the valley (Convallaria majalis)

Pearl basket (Anaphalis triplinivernis)

Peony (Paeonia)

Jacob's Ladder (Polemonium caeruleum)

Cranesbill (Geranium)

Pull young plants into pots

You should completely abstain from coveted species or grow them in pots as seedlings until they are big enough. These include Larkspur, Funkie, Dahlia, Lily, Lupine, Maiden's Eye, Sun Bride and many annual summer flowers, including mostly marigolds (Tagetes), sunflowers and zinnias. Vegetables and herbs are safest in raised beds. Incidentally, housing snails such as the little snail snail and the snail are not considered garden pests. They feed on dead plant parts and algae growth.

Video Board: How to control snails & slugs in your garden - 5 EZ organic methods.

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